Pharr From Heaven

xicanaxingona:

escuelitaguazabara:

-by 1965 over 34% of Puerto Rican mothers between the ages of 20-49 had been sterilized-

don’t forget that

This. They sterilized, without allowing them a proper understanding of what was being done, over 1/3rd of Puerto Rican women- so many that at the time that the children those women would have had would have been entering school the numbers were down so much they had to close many schools.

They also sterilized 1/4th of Native American women.

Let’s not forget they have forcibly sterilized black women, often immediately after childbirth or with the justification of their being “unfit mothers” because of drug addiction. 

To name a few examples….

Controlling our reproduction is an integral aspect of the oppression of women of color in the US.

pharrfromheaven:

At my abuelitas house, my older brother carrying the weight of a weatherman on his shoulders.

pharrfromheaven:

At my abuelitas house, my older brother carrying the weight of a weatherman on his shoulders.

txpopper:

After many years of wanting to visit the Don Jaramillo shrine in Falfurrias, TX I stopped by on my return trip from Houston. The peace and need for assistance within this shrine tore me apart.

Love this so much. 

usscucuboth:

Nyota Uhara

Yes, she did wear the gold command department uniform, in two episodes, “The Corbomite Manoeuvre”, and “Mudd’s Women”.

fuerzadelvalle:

image

As people enjoy time at the beach or barbequing for Labor Day, Fuerza del Valle Workers’ Center urges society to reflect on the most vulnerable sectors of the modern day workforce, those who do not get paid for their work.
We urge residents in the Rio Grande Valley to consider and partake in…

sinidentidades:

The racist immigrants carry disease rhetoric is nothing new. 

Perhaps we need a U.S. history lesson:

Under President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the U.S. forged a program, through a series of agreements with Mexico’s PRI-dominated government, called the Bracero program. This program was used to fill in the gaps in manual labor the U.S. had after the war.

It sounds like a liberal dream: immigrants being given an opportunity to work in the “land of opportunity,” yet it was hardly that. The laborers were forced into horrible working conditions. Many died from exhaustion (often from working in the sun too long) from working in the fields picking food for the U.S. Many also suffered from disease.

The U.S. decided what was best for the issue of disease: a widespread use of a highly toxic livestock pesticide that braceros were often doused in as part of processing into the U.S.

izotecipotx:

Karen Miranda-Rivadeneira | Ecuador | U.S Diaspora
My mom braiding my hair like her mother did to her from the series Other Stories 1 | 1991 | pigment print 

izotecipotx:

Karen Miranda-Rivadeneira | Ecuador | U.S Diaspora

My mom braiding my hair like her mother did to her from the series Other Stories 1 | 1991 | pigment print 

coeursfideles:

Charulata (Satyajit Ray, 1964)